CARDIOVASCULAR JOURNAL OF AFRICA: VOLUME 16, ISSUE 4, JULY 2005
  1. Title: Cardiac markers - optimising proBNP in cardiac diagnosis and management : editorial
    Authors: Jordaan, Pierre J.
    From: Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa, Vol 16, Issue 4, Jul / Aug
    Published: 2005
    Pages: p.192-193
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  2. Title: Review of manuscripts for the Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa : from the editor's desk
    Authors: Brink, A.J.
    From: Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa, Vol 16, Issue 4, Jul / Aug
    Published: 2005
    Pages: p.193
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  3. Title: Dyslipidaemia among black patients with type 2 diabetes : cardiovascular topic
    Authors: Vezi, Z.B.; Naidoo, D.P.
    From: Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa, Vol 16, Issue 4, Jul / Aug
    Published: 2005
    Pages: p.194-198
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    Abstract: Objective: To analyse the lipid profile of black patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM) irrespective of duration or control of the disease.
    Methods: This cross-sectional study evaluated the lipid profile of 62 black patients with type 2 DM. Clinical examination, fasting blood specimens for biochemistry, and urine analysis for proteinuria was determined in all patients.
    Results: Only 25% of patients had adequately controlled blood pressure (BP < 140/90). Mean fasting plasma glucose (FPG) was 10.9 mmol/l (HbA1c : 10.6%). Mean body mass index (BMI) was 32.5. The total number of patients with diabetic dyslipidaemia (DD) was 56 (90.3%). Significant differences between men and women were noted for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (0.99 vs 1.22 mmol/l, p = 0.005) and triglycerides (TG) (2.7 vs 1.8 mmol/l, p = 0.045), respectively. The commonest isolated abnormality was high LDL-C (66.1%) followed by low HDL-C (60.7%) and then high TG (57.1%).
    Conclusion: Over 90% of the black patients with type 2 DM displayed one or more features of DD affecting all major subclasses of cholesterol and triglyceride. The most frequent abnormality depicted by these patients was not the 'typical' DD (i.e. low HDL and high TG) often reported in other ethnic groups.
     
  4. Title: Sustained white cell cytokine activation in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy despite haemodynamic improvement with medical therapy : cardiovascular topic
    Authors: Brooksbank, Richard; Woodiwiss, Angela; Sliwa, Karen; Deftereos, Dawn; Essop, Mohammed R.; Sareli, Pinhas; Norton, Gavin R.
    From: Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa, Vol 16, Issue 4, Jul / Aug
    Published: 2005
    Pages: p.200-204
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    Abstract: Cytokine production in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC) may depend on neurohumoral stimulation, haemodynamic impairment or auto-antibody production. We aimed to ascertain the impact of haemodynamic improvements with standard medical therapy and neurohumoral blockade on white cell tumour necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) production in patients with IDC.
    Twenty-seven patients with IDC and NYHA class I to IV heart failure but without evidence of oedema, reduced peripheral perfusion, or elevated plasma endotoxin concentrations were evaluated for indicators of cytokine activation. Plasma TNF-a concentrations were raised (p < 0.001) in patients prior to commencement of medical therapy as compared to controls (n = 27). In addition, endotoxin-free cultured whole blood TNF-a production was enhanced (p < 0.02) in the patients. Although plasma TNF-a tended to decrease, excessive whole blood TNF-a production remained unaltered following marked improvements in haemodynamics and functional class (increase in absolute left ventricular ejection fraction = 8.7 + 2.6%, p < 0.01, 37% in NYHA functional class I after therapy) with six to 12 months of medical therapy (diuretic, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and b-blocker). Against a role for neurohumoral substances in promoting excessive white cell TNF-a synthesis the angiotensin II receptor antagonist, losartan, failed to modulate white cell TNF-a production in patients with IDC.
    We concluded that white cell TNF-a overproduction is sustained in patients with IDC despite haemodynamic improvement with standard medical therapy and blockade of angiotensin II receptors. These data suggest that mechanisms other than haemodynamic impairment and neurohumoral activation contribute to excess white cell TNF-a production in IDC.
     
  5. Title: Cardiac findings in children admitted to a hospital general ward in South Africa : a comparison of HIV-infected and uninfected children : cardiovascular topic
    Authors: Brown, S.C.; Schoeman, C.J.; Bester, C.J.
    From: Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa, Vol 16, Issue 4, Jul / Aug
    Published: 2005
    Pages: p.206-210
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    Abstract: The aim of this prospective observational study was to determine the presence of cardiac abnormalities in HIV-infected versus uninfected children who were admitted to a general paediatric ward during a two-month period. HIV status was determined by antibody and p24 antigen testing. Clinical information, echocardiography and electrocardiography (ECG) were performed for all children. There were 90 HIV-infected and 118 uninfected children. The median age was 9.6 and 11.8 months for infected and uninfected children, respectively. Baseline left ventricular dysfunction, defined as a shortening fraction < 25%, was found in 13 (17%) of the HIV-infected children compared to 5 (8%) uninfected children (p < 0.05). Left ventricular end-diastolic enlargement above the 98th percentile for age was found in 24% of the infected and 20% of uninfected children. Pericardial effusions, although common, were sub-clinical and not different in the groups. ECG findings and resting heart rates were also similar. Left ventricular dysfunction was the most significant cardiac abnormality present in hospitalised HIV-infected children. Other abnormalities, although common, were mostly asymptomatic and found with the same frequency in uninfected children. Further studies are indicated.
     
  6. Title: The William Nelson ECG quiz
    From: Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa, Vol 16, Issue 4, Jul / Aug
    Published: 2005
    Pages: p.210, 214
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  7. Title: Transient ischaemic attack : is routine use of computerised cerebral tomography worthwhile? : cardiovascular topic
    Authors: Mulaudzi, T.V.; Robbs, J.V.; Woolgar, J.; Pillay, W.; Pillay, B.
    From: Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa, Vol 16, Issue 4, Jul / Aug
    Published: 2005
    Pages: p.212-214
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    Abstract: Aim: To evaluate the role of routine computerised cerebral tomography (CCT) in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy (CEA) following transient ischaemic attach (TIA).
    Method: A retrospective review was carried out of data collected on patients with TIA who were managed at the Durban Metropolitan Vascular Service over an 11-year period. All patients underwent carotid duplex scanning and CCT, followed by carotid endarterectomy (CEA) under general anaesthesia.
    Results: The records of 140 patients were reviewed. There were 85 (61%) men and 55 (39%) women (F:M = 1:1.6). The mean age was 63 years (range 40-95 years). The presenting symptoms were amaurosis fugax, syncope and speech deficit. Risk factors for arterial disease were smoking (73%), hypertension (55%), diabetes mellitus (28%) and hyperlipidaemia (6%). Duplex ultrasonography showed significant internal carotid artery stenosis in 138 patients and occlusion in two. Arch angiography of the latter two patients showed pre-occlusive carotid stenosis. CCT scans showed abnormalities in 34 (24%) patients. These were lacunar infarcts (56%), old infarcts involving grey and white matter (32%), and cortical infarcts (12%). The findings did not influence management. All patients underwent routine CEA with selective shunting in 51 (36%) patients. Postoperative stroke rate was 2.9%.
    Conclusion: Routine CCT scanning in patients with TIA did not influence patient management and outcome. It is not cost effective and its routine use is questioned.
     
  8. Title: The effect of compressed air massage on skin blood flow and temperature : cardiovascular topic
    Authors: Mars, Maurice; Maharaj, Sunil S.; Tufts, Mark
    From: Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa, Vol 16, Issue 4, Jul / Aug
    Published: 2005
    Pages: p.215-219
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    Abstract: Aim: Compressed air massage is a new treatment modality that uses air under pressure to massage skin and muscle. It is claimed to improve skin blood flow but this has not been verified. Several pilot studies were undertaken to determine the effects of compressed air massage on skin blood flow and temperature.
    Methods: Skin blood flow (SBF), measured using laser Doppler fluxmetry and skin temperature was recorded under several different situations: (i) treatment, at 1 Bar pressure using a single-hole (5-mm) applicator head, for 1 min at each of several sites on the right and left lower legs, with SBF measured on the dorsum of the left foot; (ii) at the same treatment pressure, SBF was measured over the left tibialis anterior when treatment was performed at different distances from the probe; (iii) SBF and skin temperature of the lower leg were measured with treatment at 0 or 1 Bar for 45 min, using two different applicator heads; (iv) SBF was measured on the dorsum of the foot of 10 subjects with treatment for 1 min at 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Bar using three different applicator heads.
    Results: (i) SBF of the left foot was not altered by treatment of the right leg or chest, but was significantly increased during treatment of the left sole and first web, p < 0.0001. (ii) SBF over the tibialis anterior was increased when treatment was 5 cm from the probe, p < 0.0001, but not when 10 cm away. (iii) SBF was significantly elevated throughout the 45-min treatments at 1 Bar and returned to normal within 1 min of stopping treatment. Skin temperature fell by 6.8oC and 4.3oC after 45-min treatments at 1 Bar, and slight rewarming occurred within 15 min. At 0 Bar, no change in SBF or temperature was noted. (iv) A near-linear increase in SBF was noted with increasing treatment pressure for two of the three applicator heads.
    Conclusion: Compressed air massage causes an immediate increase in SBF, and an immediate fall in SBF when treatment is stopped. The effect appears to be locally and not centrally mediated and is related to the pressure used. Treatment cools the skin for at least 15 min after a 45-min treatment.
     
  9. Title: Biventricular pacing for heart failure alters electro-mechanical coupling of both ventricles : cardiovascular topic
    Authors: Munclinger, Miroslav J.; Thornton, Andrew S.; Wasiak, Malgorziata M.
    From: Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa, Vol 16, Issue 4, Jul / Aug
    Published: 2005
    Pages: p.220-226
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    Abstract: Aim: The exact mechanisms whereby biventricular pacing enables cardiac resynchronisation are not completely understood. This study looked at the effect of biventricular pacing on interventricular asynchrony in patients submitted to biventricular pacing.
    Methods: A prospective series of 13 consecutive patients were selected from those referred for biventricular pacing. Criteria used included heart failure and QRS factors, as well as echocardiographic evidence of both intraventricular and interventricular asynchrony. Midterm follow-up of clinical and echocardiographic parameters are presented.
    Results: All patients' clinical conditions improved significantly. Expectedly, diastolic filling parameters, ejection fraction and mitral regurgitation also improved significantly. The difference in the timing of left and right ventricular ejections of 65 ms at the baseline was corrected to 3 to 5 ms during six-month follow-ups after biventricular pacing. This effect was achieved by significant shortening of the left ventricular pre-ejection interval by 29 to 39 ms (p < 0.01) and by significant prolonging of the right ventricular pre-ejection interval by 18 to 30 ms (p < 0.01).
    Conclusion: Complete interventricular mechanical resynchronisation due to biventricular pacing occurred not only by the expected advancement in left ventricular ejection, but also by a delay in right ventricular ejection. The specific significance of correcting interventricular asynchrony with regard to the benefit and selection of patients for resynchronisation therapy remains to be fully established.
     
  10. Title: Frans Jacobus Maritz : 30-01-1949 to 23-06-2005 : obituary
    Authors: Brink, A.J.; Nell, Haylene; Naude, Linda
    From: Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa, Vol 16, Issue 4, Jul / Aug
    Published: 2005
    Pages: p.226
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  11. Title: The prevalence of risk factors for coronary artery disease in patients who had had CABG : short communication
    Authors: Swart, M.J.; Coetzer, S.; Korb, A.; Schoeman, C.; Joubert, G.
    From: Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa, Vol 16, Issue 4, Jul / Aug
    Published: 2005
    Pages: p.227-228
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    Abstract: The conclusion of Ranjith and his co-workers from their study 'Demographic data and the outcome of acute coronary syndrome in the South African Asian Indian population' drew our attention. Young South African Indians frequently have premature atherosclerosis with diffuse and aggressive disease. This should be taken into account for risk intervention. We would like to add to this.
     
  12. Title: Cardiovascular disease : hormone replacement therapy and the window of opportunity : letter to the editor
    Authors: Cheifitz, R.L.
    From: Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa, Vol 16, Issue 4, Jul / Aug
    Published: 2005
    Pages: p.229-230
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  13. Title: ESPRIT study results show benefit of telmisartan in severe kidney disease : drug trends in cardiology
    From: Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa, Vol 16, Issue 4, Jul / Aug
    Published: 2005
    Pages: p.231
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  14. Title: ESC guidelines - new studies of ARBs included and more device-orientated : drug trends in cardiology
    From: Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa, Vol 16, Issue 4, Jul / Aug
    Published: 2005
    Pages: p.231-232
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  15. Title: Diabetic patients on atorvastatin calcium experience major reductions in heart attack and stroke : drug trends in cardiology
    From: Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa, Vol 16, Issue 4, Jul / Aug
    Published: 2005
    Pages: p.234
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  16. Title: Oral anti-diabetic drugs show regression of carotid IMT in type 2 diabetes : drug trends in cardiology
    From: Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa, Vol 16, Issue 4, Jul / Aug
    Published: 2005
    Pages: p.235
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  17. Title: DIRECT study evaluates prevention of diabetic retinopathy on intensive candesartan cilexetil therapy : drug trends in cardiology
    From: Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa, Vol 16, Issue 4, Jul / Aug
    Published: 2005
    Pages: p.236
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  18. Title: Treatment of chronic stable angina - a synergy of symptomatic benefit and long-term outcome : drug trends in cardiology
    From: Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa, Vol 16, Issue 4, Jul / Aug
    Published: 2005
    Pages: p.236, 238
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  19. Title: Potassium as a complement to a low-sodium diet in hypertension prevention : drug trends in cardiology
    From: Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa, Vol 16, Issue 4, Jul / Aug
    Published: 2005
    Pages: p.238
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  20. Title: Cardio news
    From: Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa, Vol 16, Issue 4, Jul / Aug
    Published: 2005
    Pages: p.240
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Efficacy of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in a sub-aortic aneurysm case

Published: 29 June 2017
 
 
A preliminary review of warfarin toxicity in a tertiary hospital in Cape Town, South Africa

Published: 21 June 2017
 
 
Effects of age on systemic inflamatory response syndrome and results of coronary bypass surgery

Published: 23 May 2017
 
 
Pilot study of risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease in northern and southern Cameroonians

Published: 17 May 2017
 
 
Clinical profile, management and outcomes of patients with pulmonary embolism: a retrospective tertiary centre study in Angola

Published: 17 May 2017
 
 
Role of melatonin in glucose uptake by cardiomyocytes from insulin-resistant Wistar rats

Published: 17 May 2017
 
 
Atorvastatin inhibits cholesterol-induced caspase-3 cleavage through down-regulation of p38 and up-regulation of Bcl-2 in the rat carotid artery

Published: 10 May 2017
 
 
Relationship between coronary tortuosity and plateletcrit coronary tortuosity and plateletcrit

Published: 26 April 2017
 
 
Clinical presentation and outcomes of patients with acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease seen at a tertiary hospital setting in Port Elizabeth, South Africa

Published: 20 April 2017
 
 
Electrocardiographic abnormalities in treatment-naïve HIV subjects in south-east Nigeria

Published: 24 March 2017
 
 
Medication adherence among cardiac patients in Khartoum State, Sudan: a cross-sectional study

Published: 24 March 2017
 
 
An unusual case of aorta–right atrial tunnel with windsock aneurysm: imaging, diagnosis and treatment

Published: 15 March 2017
 
 
Prevalence of rheumatic valvular heart disease in Rwandan school children: echocardiographic evaluation using the World Heart Federation criteria

Published: 1 March 2017
 
 
Factors affecting interest in cardiothoracic surgery among junior surgical residents in Nigeria

Published: 1 March 2017
 
 
New World’s old disease: cardiac hydatid disease and surgical principles

Published: 20 February 2017
 
 
The prevalence and radiological findings of pulmonary embolism in HIV-positive patients referred for computed tomography pulmonary angiography in the Western Cape of South Africa

Published: 15 February 2017
 
 
Right ventricular strain as predictor of pulmonary complications in patients with femur fracture

Published: 01 February 2017
 
 
Atrial myxoma: a rare cause of hemiplegia in children

Published: 09 December 2016
 
 
Left ventricular haematoma mimicking lateral wall myocardial infarction secondary to percutaneous coronary intervention

Published: 10 November 2016
 
 
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